Cooking with persimmons

COOKING WITH PERSIMMONS

Kale Smoothies

Megan…

… is a plant-based chef who founded Little Bird Organics littlebirdorganics.co.nz

Here’s her recipe for…

OVERNIGHT BIRCHER MUESLI WITH PERSIMMONS

And here’s the webisode.

A nourishing, hearty breakfast can do wonders for your day. If you’re someone who doesn’t have time to prepare a breakfast in the morning, this could help set you on the right track for the day, simply by making it the night before. You could also put it in a jar and have it at the office.
The oats I use are Bob’s Red Mill Oats which are tested for gluten. But they still contain a protein called avenin which can also be an allergen for coeliacs. Use regular oats if gluten is not a problem for you.

BIRCHER MUESLI BASE
1 cup oats
2 tablespoons sunflower seeds
2 tablespoons black or white chia seeds
3 tablespoons dried coconut
1 tablespoon runny honey
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 cup coconut milk

Place all ingredients into a bowl and mix together well. Cover and refrigerate overnight.
The bircher base will keep in the fridge for a few days.

MACERATED PERSIMMONS
3 persimmons, peeled
4 cm piece of ginger
1 tablespoon runny honey
few pinches of ground cardamom (optional)

Cut persimmons into bite sized chunks.
Grate ginger on the small size of the grater, then gather into your hands and squeeze over the fruit.
Drizzle honey over the fruit and leave overnight to infuse flavours.

TO SERVE
coconut yoghurt (optional)
a few roughly chopped macadamia nuts (optional)
zest of a lime (optional)
2 teaspoons honey

Divide the bircher muesli into bowls. Carefully spoon persimmons on top and, if using, add a dollop of coconut yoghurt and the macadamia nuts.
Grate a bit of lime zest over the top and finish with a teaspoon of runny honey.
Serves 2.

Nellie…

… is a naturopath and nutritionist nelliepigot.co.nz

Persimmons are one of the fruits that are exceptionally high in Vitamin A, C and E. They’re also brimming with antioxidants such as beta carotene, lutein and lycopene, which are really good for eye health and skin health. They’re high in fibre too – even more so than apples.

There are two different types – the non-astringent variety which is more popular and you eat when it’s a bit crunchy like an apple; and the astringent ones that are inedible until they’re almost rotten (there’s a small window when you can eat them) and they’re very juicy, soft and almost jelly-like. This astringent variety is high in tannic acid which can cause constipation by slowing the transit time and this means it’s useful in the case of diarrhoea.